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Bug 599582

Summary: Kernel not installed during upgrade with /boot on separate partition
Product: [Fedora] Fedora Reporter: Joe Sapp <sapp>
Component: preupgradeAssignee: Richard Hughes <richard>
Status: CLOSED WONTFIX QA Contact: Fedora Extras Quality Assurance <extras-qa>
Severity: medium Docs Contact:
Priority: low    
Version: 13CC: rhughes, richard
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Hardware: All   
OS: Linux   
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Fixed In Version: Doc Type: Bug Fix
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Clone Of: Environment:
Last Closed: 2010-06-03 13:25:33 EDT Type: ---
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oVirt Team: --- RHEL 7.3 requirements from Atomic Host:

Description Joe Sapp 2010-06-03 10:35:22 EDT
Description of problem:
The 'kernel' package wasn't installed correctly into my /boot partition when I used preupgrade to upgrade from F12 to F13.

Version-Release number of selected component (if applicable):
1.1.7-1.fc12

How reproducible:
Unknown

Steps to Reproduce:
1. Put /boot on separate partition (set the 'noauto' option in /etc/fstab)
2. Run `preupgrade`
3. Reboot
  
Actual results:
Kernel installed into root partition (the one it identified for the upgrade) and erased all old /lib/modules/* directories belonging to Fedora-installed kernels.  After the install, the old kernels still on the /boot partition couldn't find and modules it needed.

Expected results:
New kernel installed into /boot (or at least prompted to mount it).  Old kernels not wiped out.

Additional info:
Keeping around the old kernel module directories would have let me boot up successfully at least so I could fix it myself.  Admittedly this is something a casual user probably wouldn't do, so I'm not suggesting a real clever fix.
Comment 1 Richard Hughes 2010-06-03 11:18:20 EDT
(In reply to comment #0)
> ... (set the 'noauto' option in /etc/fstab)

Why did you do this?

Richard.
Comment 2 Joe Sapp 2010-06-03 12:24:09 EDT
(In reply to comment #1)
> (In reply to comment #0)
> > ... (set the 'noauto' option in /etc/fstab)
> 
> Why did you do this?

I don't want my /boot partition mounted automatically.  If you're asking why I don't want it mounted all the time, I guess I don't want to accidentally clobber my kernel or grub configuration.  It doesn't really need to be mounted except when there's a kernel to update.
Comment 3 Richard Hughes 2010-06-03 12:58:53 EDT
(In reply to comment #2)
> It doesn't really need to be mounted except when there's a kernel to update.    

So how does yum mount /boot when you install a kernel update?
Comment 4 Joe Sapp 2010-06-03 13:04:03 EDT
(In reply to comment #3)
> So how does yum mount /boot when you install a kernel update?    

It doesn't.  I see a kernel update and mount /boot before performing the update.
Comment 5 Richard Hughes 2010-06-03 13:25:33 EDT
(In reply to comment #4)
> It doesn't.  I see a kernel update and mount /boot before performing the
> update.    

Then you need to do the same with preupgrade. Sorry, closing.
Comment 6 Joe Sapp 2010-06-03 13:31:00 EDT
(In reply to comment #5)
> Then you need to do the same with preupgrade.

How exactly is one supposed to do that in anaconda?  Did I need to search the Fedora wiki for boot parameters to make a console available?  There was no console available after the reboot; anaconda just started updating all the installed packages.